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20130228
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
to the region. >> the army in pakistan has held a massive funeral for the soldiers killed in a taliban attack on saturday. the taliban says that the attack was in response to a u.s. drone strike from last month. sectarian violence led to dismissal of the local government back in january. the central government has taken over, but she a muslims say that they are still being attacked -- shia muslims say they are still being attacked. >> for these men, there are no words. again the community mourns. this time it was for a police officer who shot for being a shia muslim. according to one estimate, over the last 10 years nearly 3000 [indiscernible] shia have been killed in violent acts. every month, the violence continues. january 10, two massive bomb blasts ripped through the streets, killing over 100 people. 86 people have been found and their bodies have been buried, but 17 are still missing and locals say that they will never find them, that their bodies will disburse far too wide in the aftermath of the attack. the rebuilding and damage is still clear from the grief felt by this community. >>
for smoking a cigarette. that's why the taliban were not that hard to overthrow in 2001, because the people of afghanistan turned against this barbaric code that the taliban were trying to impose. and this is, you know, in iraq and in afghanistan hardly two of the most liberal, cosmopolitan countries in the world. today i suspect you're seeing much the same thing happen in northern mali where the islamists have tried to impose a very brutal code, and i suspect it's not proving very popular. however, the reason why these groups can have end during appeal is because there's not a good alternative. and the problem that we faced, for example, in afghanistan is that brutal and unpopular as the taliban are, the government has often been worse because the government has not delivered any kind of justice. what the government delivers is a decision that goes to the highest bidder. and so that bad as the taliban y be, they're less corrupt. and you will get a more or less honest judgment out of them which will then be enforced with barbaric severity. that's not the ideal that people want, but it may b
by people that said they would be executed for smoking a cigarette. that's where the taliban were not hard to overthrow in 2001 because the people of afghanistan turned against this code the taliban were trying to impose and this is in iraq and afghanistan hardly the most cosmopolitan countries in the world. today i suspect you see much the same thing happened where they tried to impose a very brutal quote and i suspect it's not proving very popular. however, the reason these groups can have the appeal is because there's not a good alternative, and the problem that we face for example in afghanistan is that brutal and unpopular as they are the government has often been worse because the government hasn't delivered any kind of justice. what the government delivers is a decision that goes to the highest bid so as bad as the taliban maybe they are less corrupt and you won't get a more or less honest judgment out of them that will then be enforced to the barbaric severity. that's not the ideal people want but it may be better than the alternative and so i think the challenge we face in the cou
by the taliban has had major surgery and in the u.k. she was airlifted to britain in october after being targeted for promoting growth and education. doctors worked on reconstructing her skull and restoring hearing. they say she is making good progress. successful projects raise awareness and millions of dollars. it does not necessarily help the cause. >> inside a small london shop, something rather peculiar is going on. and walnuts are meeting their doom and one by one. this is a hard edge of their battle against prostate cancer in the u.k. chris adams has the disease and is the trustee for the charity. >> there has been a significant increase in the awareness of prostate cancer. we have not cracked a walnut and yet, but we are working on it. >> smashing nuts may seem like an odd way to fight the disease, but so is growing a mustache or getting a 69-year-old grammy on board or dressing up in costumes to run yourself to exhaustion. these are always charities have chosen to get themselves notice. it is very business minded, and is working. >> they try to build an identity. they are trying to engag
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)